Patron Mini-Review: The Girl on the Train

We’re asking patrons and friends of the library to write mini-reviews of the books they read. You can write a couple of sentences to 200 words. Choose a new book, like today’s Finders Keepers, by Stephen King, or it choose an old classic you’d like to recommend. If it’s in the library, it’s fair game for a Mini-Review.

Today’s Mini-Review from Steve:

The Girl on the Train, by Paula Hawkins

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Rachel is unhappy. Having lost her job, she is in a state of denial, drinking too much, and pretending to go to work every day on the train. The train that she rides to London each day takes her past her old neighborhood. From the window of the train she observes not only her old garden that backs up to the tracks, but also the daily activities of another couple who reside down the street from her previous home. In her imagination, she has given the couple names and has created a fairy tale love life for them. Real life, however, cannot live up to her fantasy, and the couple does not have the picture perfect relationship that Rachel has concocted. When a murder occurs, Rachel becomes entangled in the investigation because of what she has witnessed on her daily commute. A smart thriller that grabs hold of you early and won’t let you go. I was quite shocked by the ending. One thing though: Try to read it over a few days.  It helps keep the characters straight.  I’m looking forward to the film in 2016.

 

Write your own Mini-Review! Whether new, or not-so-new, tell us what you thought of the book, in 200 words or less, even just a sentence or three. Loved it? Hated it? Would you recommend it? Why? We’ll post your review here on the library’s blog and you can share it wherever you’d like. We won’t pass along your private info or email address. To email your own mini-review click here!

Youth Mini-Review: House of Hades by Rick Riordan

House of HadesThe House of Hades By: Rick Riordan

“This is a book full of people being scared but yet brave and heroic.  If you like these things, you should read this book.”

Write your own Mini-Review! Whether new, or not-so-new, tell us what you thought of the book, in 200 words or less, even just a sentence or three. Loved it? Hated it? Would you recommend it? Why? We’ll post your review here on the library’s blog and you can share it wherever you’d like.

Patron Mini Book Review: Auschwitz

We’re asking patrons and friends of the library to write mini-reviews of the books they read. You can write a couple of sentences to 200 words. Choose a new book, like today’s Finders Keepers, by Stephen King, or choose an old classic you’d like to recommend. If it’s in the library, it’s fair game for a Mini-Review.

Today’s Mini-Review from Pat:

Auschwitz By: Miklos Nyisli

Auschwitz is a painfully clear picture of the conditions that evolved from the incarceration of millions of human beings until the final gruesome extermination conceived by their Nazi captors.  It was also a painful account of the few that managed to stay alive by being useful to their captors.  This is another story in itself.  I can’t say I enjoyed reading Auschwitz but I think it is a book that every generation should read.

Patron Mini-Review–Beyond Words

51zurwqtBNL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_We’re asking patrons and friends of the library to write mini-reviews of the books they read. You can write a couple of sentences to 200 words. Choose a new book, like today’s Finders Keepers, by Stephen King, or it choose an old classic you’d like to recommend. If it’s in the library, it’s fair game for a Mini-Review.

Today’s Mini-Review from Lana:

Beyond Words, What Animals Think and Feel, by Carl Safina

If human brains are structurally similar to other mammals are the functions
similar also? Carl Safina describes thee interaction between wolf, dolphin,
whale and elephant families.

In the 1850’s the grey whales, who migrate from Alaska to Baja to birth their
babies, were mercilessly slaughtered. Today they approach small boats of
tourists and even expose their young to the humans.

From the book:

“Please tell us a story that distances us from all other life.”
Why? Because we desperately need to believe we are not unique – as all species
are – but that we are so very special, that we are resplendent, transcendent,
translucent, divinely inspired, weightlessly imbued with eternal souls.
Anything less induces dread and existential panic.

For more information on how we treat marine mammals read War of the Whales by
Joshua Horwitz.

Write your own Mini-Review! Whether new, or not-so-new, tell us what you thought of the book, in 200 words or less, even just a sentence or three. Loved it? Hated it? Would you recommend it? Why? We’ll post your review here on the library’s blog and you can share it wherever you’d like. We won’t pass along your private info or email address. To email your own mini-review click here!

 

Mini-Review–Staff Pick, Empire of the Summer Moon

Empire of the sunWe’re asking patrons and friends of the library to write mini-reviews of the books they read. You can write a couple of sentences to 200 words. Choose a new book from our 7 day shelf, an old classic, or anything in between. If you’d like to recommend it or warn against it, we want to hear your thoughts. If it’s in the library, it’s fair game for a Mini-Review.  

Today’s Mini-Review is a Staff Pick edition from Linda about the Empire of the Summer Moon, Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History, by S.C. Gwynne:

Wonderful book! I could not put it down. Made me want to cry about how the Indians were treated. What an eye-opener!

 

Write your own Mini-Review! Whether new, or not-so-new, tell us what you thought of the book, in 200 words or less, even just a sentence or three. Loved it? Hated it? Would you recommend it? Why? We’ll post your review here on the library’s blog and you can share it wherever you’d like. We won’t pass along your private info or email address. To email your own mini-review click here!

 

 

Mini-Review, Finders Keepers, by Stephen King

Book Review Finders KeepersWe’re asking patrons and friends of the library to write mini-reviews of the books they read. You can write a couple of sentences to 200 words. Choose a new book, like today’s Finders Keepers, by Stephen King, or it choose an old classic you’d like to recommend. If it’s in the library, it’s fair game for a Mini-Review.  

Here is our first Mini-Review, today by John H.:

Do yourself a favor. Assuming you’re a reader, go get yourself a copy of Stephen King’s newest book, Finders Keepers. Well, maybe first you should read Mr. Mercedes–which is a fine book all by itself—but Finders Keepers is a sequel to it so you might want to read the first one first and so on. Not that you couldn’t read it all by itself–you could but all the characters are introduced in the first one and… You know what? Just read them both in whatever order you want.

“But,” you’re saying, “I don’t care for horror novels!” Well, then these are for you. King has managed to turn out some page-turning detective novels with nary a creepy nor a crawly to be found and that are guaranteed to be un-put-downable. Actually there’s not a guarantee attached, but trust me, library-review-reader, you should give them a chance.

Write your own Mini-Review! Whether new, or not-so-new, tell us what you thought of the book, in 200 words or less, even just a sentence or three. Loved it? Hated it? Would you recommend it? Why? We’ll post your review here on the library’s blog and you can share it wherever you’d like. We won’t pass along your private info or email address. To email your own mini-review click here!